SiteLock David Isaacs, DDS, Amanda Harris, DMD

Periodontal Disease


Any Periodontal disease we diagnose and we will talk to you about it,
answer any questions you may have, and create you a treatment plan.
x-rays must be taken to diagnose.

 

  1. Q

    Do you have Periodontal Disease?

    A

    If you have been told you have periodontal (gum) disease, you are not alone. Many adults in the U.S. currently have some form of the disease. Periodontal diseases range from simple gum inflammation to serious disease that results in major damage to the soft tissue and bone that support the teeth. In the worst cases, teeth are lost.
  2. Q

    What causes gum disease?

    A

    Our mouths are full of bacteria. These bacteria, along with mucus and other particles, constantly form a sticky, colorless plaque on teeth. Brushing and flossing help get rid of plaque. Plaque that is not removed can harden and form tartar that brushing doesn't clean. Only a professional cleaning by a dentist or dental hygienist can remove tartar.
  3. Q

    Gingivitis

    A

    The longer plaque and tartar are on teeth, the more harmful they become. The bacteria cause inflammation of the gums that is called gingivitis. In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis is a mild form of gum disease that can usually be reversed with daily brushing and flossing, and regular cleaning by a dentist or dental hygienist. This form of gum disease does not include any loss of bone and tissue that hold teeth in place.
  4. Q

    Periodontitis

    A

    When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis (which means inflammation around the tooth). In periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces (called pockets) that become infected. The body's immune system fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Bacterial toxins and the body's natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. The teeth may eventually become loose and have to be removed.
  5. Q

    Root Planing and Scaling for Gum Disease

    A

    Root planing and scaling is one of the most effective ways to treat gum disease before it becomes severe. Root planing and scaling cleans between the gums and the teeth down to the roots. Your dentist may need to use a local anesthetic to numb your gums and the roots of your teeth Some dentists and dental hygienists will use an ultrasonic tool for the planing and scaling. This tool is not as uncomfortable as a standard scraping tool, but not all cleanings require this type of tool.
  6. Q

    What To Expect After Treatment

    A

    If anesthesia is used, your lips and gums may remain numb for a few hours. Planing and scaling causes little or no discomfort.
  7. Q

    Why It Is Done?

    A

    Root planing and scaling is done when gums have either started to pull away from the teeth or the roots of the teeth have hard mineral deposits (tartar) on them.
SiteLock David Isaacs, DDS, Amanda Harris, DMD